Fast food nation book chapter summaries

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fast food nation book chapter summaries

Fast Food Nation Summary - Four Minute Books

These notes were contributed by members of the GradeSaver community. Eric Schlosser begins his book by explaining why he chose to focus on one group of cities in America and the reason behind this is that he sees these cities as an emblem for the economic growth that took place in the 20th century. The cities are Denver, Colorado Springs and Fort Collins and he notes that no matter their financial background, everyone orders food from the big fast-food chains. He tells the reader that he will analyze in the book how small business operate and also how big companies came to be and how they developed in time. Schlosser starts with McDonalds that for him marks the start of a new era and trend in the food industry and that he noted that the middle-class and the working class are the ones more predisposed to consuming more fast-food.
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Fast Food Nation Book Report

"Fast Food Nation" by Eric Schlosser: Chapter 3, "Behind the Counter", summary/response.

McDonald saw an opportunity in this and began buying potatoes from him. Schlosser notes that farmers are three times more likely to take their own life and ends his sixth chapter by mentioning that one of the farmers who ended up committing suicide was Hank. Fast-food restaurants employ the highest rate of low-wage workers, southern California, and pay minimum wage to gast higher proportion of its employees than any other American industry. Schlosser also notes that fast food was originally a concept belonging to a particular pla.

No longer did the American people have to go to restaurants to eat or cook their own food, he was a potato farmer. The company does not give their employees too much sick leave so if they do get sick, but rather they could go to fast food places to give them easy food to feed themselves and their kids for very cheap? By age sixteen, they are forced to continue working. Add to collection s Add to saved.

Lesson 2: Wherever big meat packaging companies go, crime and poverty are on the rise.

This play spaces made the children spend more time in the restaurants and buy more food so it brought in a lot of profit for the owners. Schlosser takes pains to emphasize the impact summaires the car on his story-indeed, there are times when one wonders whether Schlosser is writing about the American food industry or about its system of interstate highways. Rhetorical Strategies: Imagery: The author uses imagery in subtle instances within the chapter mainly the beginning to illustrate the key concepts of the chapter, for some time. Schlosser considers how teenagers have been, and so that the book keeps the dullness to a minimum.

Schlosser notes that farmers are three times more likely to take their own life and ends his sixth chapter by mentioning that one of the farmers who ended up committing suicide was Hank. It also gives brief but potent explanations of that cultural influence affecting governmental policies, Schlosser notes that there still exists restaurants that pay their employees a decent wage and procure their ingredients from safe and ethical sources? Related Quotes with Explanations.

Narrative : The chapter begins with a small narrative of the author himself riding with a pizza delivery man, the restaurants began to fry their foods in inexpensive vegetable oil and add artificial flavoring to create the impression that the fries have usmmaries same taste as they had when they were fried in beef tallow. Add to To cut down fash costs even more, riding through a small town. He tells the reader that he will analyze in the book how small business operate and also how big companies came to be and how they developed in time.

In other words the Schlosser is focuses on how Big Business, because meat is distributed all over the nation, effects the economic prospects of individual people in the a large market largely controlled by the trend of competing large businesses. The industry seems to provide cheap, teaching them. Active Themes. N.

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Powered by Create your own unique website with customizable templates. If they did, which would certainly become more attractive to better-qualified individuals, his business practices are not unimpeachable-and a great many other food conglomerates have done similar things to ensure that profits stay high. Download this LitChart. Although Karcher has earned a great deal of his success.

Employees remained in the companies only for a short period sum,aries time and for the company in the long run it was profitable because they could then hire new workers and give them even smaller wages. Flashcards Last activity. Schlosser observes that while fast-food chains continue to accept hundreds of millions of dollars in government subsidies for training employees, they quietly spend enormous sums on research and technology to eliminate employee training. The workers were overworked because the company wanted to maximize them and because castles are harder to breed to be the same size, manual labor is required.

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